Donate
IETF 103, Day 4: Trusted Systems, IoT & IPv6 Thumbnail
‹ Back
IETF 7 November 2018

IETF 103, Day 4: Trusted Systems, IoT & IPv6

Kevin Meynell
By Kevin MeynellManager, Technical and Operational Engagements

This week is IETF 103 in Bangkok, Thailand, and we’re bringing you daily blog posts highlighting the topics of interest to us in the ISOC Internet Technology Team. Thursday actually represents the last day of the meeting this time, although there’s still several sessions to draw attention to.

SUIT is meeting first thing at 09.00 UTC+9. This is considering how the firmware of IoT devices can securely updated, and the architecture and information models for this will be discussed. There are three other drafts relating to manifest formats that are the meta-data describing the firmware images.


NOTE: If you are unable to attend IETF 103 in person, there are multiple ways to participate remotely.


DMM is the first of the afternoon sessions at 13.50 UTC+7, and there are several IPv6-related drafts under consideration. Proxy Mobile IPv6 extensions for Distributed Mobility Management proposes a solution whereby mobility sessions are anchored at the last IP hop router, whilst Segment Routing IPv6 for Mobile User Plane defines segment routing behaviour and applicability to the mobile user plane behaviour and defines the functions for that. There’s also three updated drafts on 5G implementations which may interest some.

To round off the week, there’s a choice of two sessions starting at 16.10 UTC+7.

ACME will be focusing on the ACME TLS ALPN extension that allows for domain control validation using TLS, and Support for Short-Term, Automatically-Renewed (STAR) Certificates. It will also consider how ACME can support TLS certificates for end-users.

Alternatively, 6TiSCH will be focusing on the specification for a combining a high speed powered backbone and subnetworks using IEEE 802.15.4 time-slotted channel hopping (TSCH). The 6top protocol that enables distributed scheduling is now heading for publication as an RFC, and there are also updates to the description of a scheduling function that defines the behavior of a node when joining a network and to define a security framework for joining a 6TiSCH network. If there’s time, a method to protect network nodes against a selective jamming attack will be discussed.

With that, IETF 103 comes to a close and we say Sà-wàd-dee to Bangkok. Many thanks for reading along this week… please do read our other IETF 103-related posts … and we’ll see you at IETF 104 which is being on 23-29 March 2019 in Prague, Czech Republic.

Relevant Working Groups

‹ Back

Related articles

The Internet Society's Hot Topics at IETF 103
The Internet Society's Hot Topics at IETF 103
IETF2 November 2018

The Internet Society’s Hot Topics at IETF 103

The 103rd meeting of the IETF starts tomorrow in Bangkok which is the first time that an IETF meeting has...

IETF 103, Day 2: IPv6, NTP, Routing Security & IoT
IETF 103, Day 2: IPv6, NTP, Routing Security & IoT
IETF5 November 2018

IETF 103, Day 2: IPv6, NTP, Routing Security & IoT

This week is IETF 103 in Bangkok, Thailand, and we're bringing you daily blog posts highlighting the topics of interest to...

Rough Guide to IETF 100: Internet of Things
Rough Guide to IETF 100: Internet of Things
IETF9 November 2017

Rough Guide to IETF 100: Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a major buzzword around the Internet industry and the broader technology and innovation business...

Join the conversation with Internet Society members around the world