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Public Policy

IGF Baku

What is Internet Public Policy?

Our work is based upon our fundamental belief that the Internet is for everyone. In pursuing our objectives, we operate collaboratively and inclusively, working with governments, national and international organizations, civil society, the private sector, and other parties to reach decisions about the Internet that conform to our core values. A primary focus of our public policy work is Internet governance which in 2016 is focused on these three areas:

Our work is informed by the results of our 2015 Internet Governance Survey and we created an Internet Governance Timeline to help track the many events happening over the course of 2016.

How We Work

We work in a multi-stakeholder fashion towards the development of an Open and Sustainable Internet for the benefit of all people. Because the Internet impacts all of us, we work with partners globally of all shapes and sizes to make sure we can address a wide range of social, economic, and policy issues that interfere with an open and sustainable Internet.  For more information regarding our community and partners please visit our Community and Partners Page.

 

Public Policy Blog

  • What are the best ways to reduce spam? How can we work together to reduce this threat and create a more trusted Internet? 

    Last October, in the vibrant city of Bangkok, the Internet Society joined regulators for an in-depth conversation about how to eliminate spam and its harmful effects. Our kind hosts were the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) and the International Institute of Communications (ICC). 

    The CRTC has published a comprehensive and insightful report on the workshop, capturing the key issues, observations, and ways...

    Date published 21 April 2017

  • Last week, the G20’s ministers responsible for the digital economy met in Düsseldorf to prepare this year´s G20 summit, scheduled for Hamburg, July 2017. Building on important strides initiated two years ago during the G20 summit in Antalya and based on the G20 Digital Economy Development and Cooperation Initiative (DEDCI), which was adopted last year under the Chinese G20 presidency, the Düsseldorf meeting adopted a “ G20 Digital Economy Ministerial Declaration” which includes also a “Roadmap for Digitalisation”. One day before the ministerial meeting, non-state actors were invited to...

    Date published 14 April 2017

  • On 7 April, the Russian Internet Governance Forum (RIGF) took place in the new city of Innopolis, near Kazan. My main takeaways from this 8th RIGF converge around three themes: digital economy, trust and the next generation of Internet aficionados. 

    Very much in line with the discussions between the G20 leaders in Germany last week, one of the key messages at RIGF was the importance of digital economy to Russia and its citizens. In his keynote address, Sergey Plugotarenko, Director of Russian Association for Electronic Communications (RAEC), emphasized the importance of the...

    Date published 13 April 2017

  • Germany wants G20 leaders to agree to a concrete plan – one that includes affordable Internet access across the world by 2025, common technical standards and a focus on digital learning.

    Today, the G20 economies, like so many other economies around the world, are digital and interconnected. Digital services have opened up new avenues for sustainable economic growth. But, the digital economy will only continue to thrive and generate opportunities for citizens if the Internet is strong, secure, and trusted. Without this foundation, the global digital economy is at risk.

    ...

    Date published 07 April 2017

  • One of the few regrets of Vint Cerf, who is often referred to as the 'father of the Internet', is the fact that encryption using public cryptography was not baked in the original ARPANET design. While the early Internet was meant to meet a number of requirements such as resilience and openness, encryption was not one of them. Some of this was because of the high cost associated with encryption, and some if it was for other reasons. This explains why encryption was only introduced at later stages when CPU and memory resources were more affordable.

    And, after the revelations in recent...

    Date published 30 March 2017

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