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Deploy360 27 May 2016

May 31 Deadline For $40,000 Cybersecurity Grant For DNSSEC, RPKI, BGP and more

Dan York
By Dan YorkDirector, Online Content

ISOC Cybersecurity GrantDo you have an idea for a project related to DNSSEC, RPKI, BGP security or other security technologies? And will that project’s activities take place in the Asia-Pacific region?  (View the list of eligible countries and economies.)

If so, the Information Society Information Fund (ISIF) Asia is seeking proposals for projects that can be funded up to a maximum of $56,000 AUD (roughly $40,000 USD). This “Cybersecurity Grant” is sponsored by the Internet Society as part of our support for the Seed Alliance.

THE DEADLINE TO SUBMIT APPLICATIONS IS TUESDAY, MAY 31!

Please read the Cybersecurity Grant page for more information and follow the instructions for applying.  Please do remember that the project activities must be conducted within one of the economies that ISIF considers to be the Asia Pacific region.  ISIF also provides some guidelines for applicants and a FAQ.

As noted on the page, the focus is around practical solutions for resiliency and security in one of these areas:

  • Naming: innovative approaches to DNSSEC that enhance user confidence in Internet-based services.
  • Routing: support for wider deployment of secure routing technologies (RPKI, BGPSEC) and best practices (MANRS).
  • Measurement: investigate the nature and extent of deployment of security solutions on the Internet.
  • Traffic management: tools to measure Internet traffic congestion and/or traffic management practices OR analysis of traffic management policies and practices.
  • Confidential communications: strategies or solutions to enhance the confidentiality of Internet traffic.
  • Data security and integrity: options for improved data security and/or data breach detection and mitigation.
  • Internet of Things (IoT): security of IoT.
  • Critical Infrastructure: security of computer-controlled systems such as energy grids, transport networks, water supply, sewage, etc.) from cyber attacks.
  • End-user device security: options for improved end-user security.
  • Building security skills in your local community.

We hope that people and organizations within the AP region will apply for this excellent grant opportunity. The application period opened up February 24 – but we thought we’d give one final notice in case people weren’t aware.

We look forward to learning in September about how the recipients will work to make the Internet more secure and resilient!

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Disclaimer: Viewpoints expressed in this post are those of the author and may or may not reflect official Internet Society positions.

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