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Deploy360 12 March 2014

On The 25th Anniversary Of The Web, Let Us Keep It Open And Make It More Secure

Dan York
By Dan YorkDirector of Web Strategy

Web 25th AnniversaryCan we even begin to count the ways the “Web” has affected all of our lives? Today is the 25th Anniversary of the proposal that led to the creation of the World Wide Web. Over at Webat25.org, Tim Berners-Lee, the W3C and the World Wide Web Foundation are celebrating this milestone with greetings from people all around the world, including Internet Society President and CEO Kathy Brown, who recorded a video greeting, as well as IETF Chair Jari Arkko and IAB Chair Russ Housely.  The WebAt25 effort is also promoting an active campaign on Twitter using the #web25 hashtag and is encouraging people everywhere to get more involved with efforts to ensure the Web remains an open platform for creativity, innovation and collaboration.

As our Leslie Daigle wrote in an excellent Internet Technology Matters post today, the Web is a prime example of how “permission-less innovation” enables the creation of new services that run on the Internet and also of both the global nature of the Internet and the value of open standards.

For us here at the Deploy360 Programme, our use of the Web is the critical cornerstone of our efforts to accelerate the deployment of key Internet technologies… even as most of the protocols (IPv6, DNSSEC, BGP) we promote are actually part of the underlying Internet infrastructure that makes services like the Web possible. Without the Web, we would not be able to bring you all the resources and news we bring you here, nor would we be able to share it with you through web-based social media. It is critical for our work.

On this day, we  join with the W3C, World Wide Web Foundation and so many others in celebrating this 25th anniversary and the amazing success of the Web. As we do so, though, we know that for the Web and other Internet services to prosper they need to not only continue to be as open as they have been in the past, but they also need to be more secure to protect the privacy and security of information. That is why we’ve worked so hard getting DNSSEC deployed more widely,  recently opened our new “TLS for Applications” topic area, and why we’re looking for your help to build more content to help application developers, website designers and many more people understand how to make the Web and other services more secure.

Thank you, Tim Berners-Lee, for the proposal 25 years ago that led to the creation of the World Wide Web, and for everything you’ve done to keep the Web open to all. We look forward to joining with people around the world to continue to keep the Web – and the Internet – open for all!

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Disclaimer: Viewpoints expressed in this post are those of the author and may or may not reflect official Internet Society positions.

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