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  • 2000

  • INET 2000 logo

    INET ’00 Yokohama

    18-21 July 2000
    INET 2000 logo

    INET ’00 Yokohama

    18-21 July 2000

    The 10th INET features a number of new tracks that reflect the millennial mood and the ascendancy of wireless technology, such as “Internet Science and Technology for the 21st Century” and “Mobile Internet and IP Network Applications”. The plenary panel discussion, “The Future of the Internet Layer”, revisits a topic (among others) that sparked debate at INET ’92, in Kobe—the exhaustion of the IPv4 address space.

  • Lynn St. Amour

    Lynn St. Amour Named President and CEO of Internet Society

    2001
    Lynn St. Amour

    Lynn St. Amour Named President and CEO of Internet Society

    2001

    Lynn St. Amour, who had previously served in the Internet Society’s Geneva office as global executive director and COO and as executive director for Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA), succeeds Don Heath as ISOC President and CEO.  Her leadership of the organization is distinguished by tremendous growth in the breadth and reach of the Internet Society’s programs in the realms of Internet policy and governance and in global development. It is also marked by the solidification of ISOC’s relationship with and support of the IETF and its standards work.

    Early in her tenure, St. Amour spearheads the Internet Society’s successful bid for the .ORG registry and establishes the Public Interest Registry (PIR) to oversee its operation. This will prove a turning point in ISOC’s fortunes, as it puts the organization on a much stronger financial footing, enabling more robust support of existing programs and partnerships and fostering the creation of new initiatives.

    The St. Amour era also sees a growing emphasis on the Internet Society's status as an international organization, through the opening of Regional Bureaus throughout the world and through ISOC’s increased presence within other international organizations.

  • Stockholm

    INET ’01 Stockholm

    5-8 June 2001
    Stockholm

    INET ’01 Stockholm

    5-8 June 2001

    The first INET of the new millennium, INET ’01 institutes changes in the conference format, with events divided into three “Summits”—Technology, Uses of the Internet, and Governance and Regulation—meant to reflect the components and forces that shape the Internet: “[T]hose who use it, those who steer it and those who build it.” Coming after the burst of the dot-com bubble but at a time when the Internet is becoming ever more entrenched in all facets of life, the conference features plenary sessions on intellectual property on the Internet and on the lessons learned thus far in Internet self-governance. For the first time at an INET, an entire conference “thread” is devoted to the IETF.

  • Washington, DC

    INET ’02 Washington, DC

    18-21 June 2002
    Washington, DC

    INET ’02 Washington, DC

    18-21 June 2002

    The first INET to be held in the US capital, INET ‘02 comes at a time when, as the notes for the Welcoming Remarks have it, “[t]he Internet is at a crossroads. In the next year or two, critical choices will be made about Internet standards and Internet policy that will shape the Internet for years for come.” One feature of the conference, the IPv6 Forum's IPv6 Technology Deployment Summit, points to one of the factors that will shape the Internet’s future. Also up for debate is the future of the INETs themselves, as one of the closing sessions asks “How can we change and improve the format and focus of the conference?” Also noteworthy in this first post-9/11 INET is a panel discussion on “Security and Anti-terrorism," which seeks to address the questions “How are terrorists, national liberation movements, and computer virus writers using the Internet? What can and should law enforcement agencies do in response?”

  • Barcelona

    INET ’04 Barcelona

    10-14 May 2004
    Barcelona

    INET ’04 Barcelona

    10-14 May 2004
    INET ’04 is held jointly with Spain’s Internet Global Conference (IGC) and features 180 speakers presenting more than 50 sessions in tracks covering a broad range of areas, including Corporate Strategy, New Technologies, Consumer Applications and Society, Politics and Culture. The 2004 conference adds an Internet Governance track, which is directed specifically at governments and policy makers and covers topics such as “The Changing Internet Standards Game," “Next Generation Policies for the Next Generation Internet," and a variety of sessions aimed at “Rethinking Internet Governance."
     
    INET 2004 will be the last of the Internet Society’s “original” INET conferences, and the last “global” INET until Global INET 2012 in Geneva.
     
  • African Network Information Center (AFRINIC) Incorporated

    October 2004

    African Network Information Center (AFRINIC) Incorporated

    October 2004

    The African Network Information Center (AFRINIC) is the Regional Internet Registry (RIR) for Africa, responsible for the distribution and management of Internet number resources such as IP addresses and ASN (Autonomou System Numbers) for the African region. After gaining provisional recognition by ICANN in October of 2004, AFRINIC becomes operational on 22 February 2005, and is granted final recognition by ICANN in April of that year.

    AFRINIC’s mission is to provide professional and efficient distribution of Internet number resources to the African Internet community, to support Internet technology usage and development across the continent, and to strengthen Internet self-governance in Africa by encouraging a participatory policy development. The Internet Society partners with AFRINIC in a number of endeavors, including seminars and workshops aimed at spreading awareness and implementation of IPv6.

  • RFC 4071

    RFC 4071 Defines the IETF Administrative Support Activity (IASA)

    April 2005
    RFC 4071

    RFC 4071 Defines the IETF Administrative Support Activity (IASA)

    April 2005

    In late 2003, the IAB set up an ad hoc advisory committee to look into and make recommendations concerning the future administrative needs of the IETF. That committee’s report was published as RFC 3716. The IETF asked the Internet Society for support in its efforts to establish an administrative restructuring process that would effect the improvements contained in that report, resulting in a commitment to establish an IASA within ISOC. RFC 4071 represents the final definition of the IASA, resulting in a streamlining of the IETF’s administrative functions, funding sources, and greater autonomy over its budget process.

    This development, and the establishment by the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI) and the Internet Society of a trust for the IETF, marks a turning point in the relationship between ISOC and the IETF, which formally becomes, along with the IAB and the RFC editor, and activity organized by the Internet Society.

  • INET 2005 Cairo

    8-10 May 2005

    INET 2005 Cairo

    8-10 May 2005

    In a departure from previous, “global” INETs, INET 2005 is a Middle East and Africa (MEA) regional conference, organized in conjunction with the Second Pan-Arab Regional Conference for the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in Cairo. In the session entitled 'The Internet: How it works, Why it works, Who makes it work?' representatives of the groups and organizations that enable and support the operation of the Internet infrastructure give first-hand information about just how the Internet coordination processes have evolved and how they work today. Speakers also include respected and experienced specialists from the MEA region.

  • ISOC IETF Fellows at IETF84

    Pilot of ISOC Fellowship to the IETF Programme

    June 2006
    ISOC IETF Fellows at IETF84

    Pilot of ISOC Fellowship to the IETF Programme

    June 2006

    The Internet Society pilots the Fellowship to the Internet Engineering Task Force programme at IETF 66 in Montreal. The success of this and a second pilot at IETF 67 lead the Internet Society to formalize the  Fellowship in 2007, as a means to identify and foster potential future leaders from emerging and developing economies and provide an opportunity for networking with individuals from around the world with similar technical interests. The program is also aimed at raising global awareness and understanding of—and participation in—the IETF and its work.

  • 2010

  • World IPv6 Day badge

    World IPv6 Day

    8 June 2011
    World IPv6 Day badge

    World IPv6 Day

    8 June 2011

    The Internet Society sponsors World IPv6 day as a global-scale test flight of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6). On World IPv6 Day, major web companies and other industry players come together to enable IPv6 on their main websites for 24 hours. The goal is to motivate organizations across the industry—Internet service providers, hardware makers, operating system vendors, and web companies—to prepare their services for IPv6, in order to ensure a successful transition as IPv4 address space runs out.

    World IPv6 Day acts as a focal point to bring existing efforts together. For the first time, players from all parts of the industry are able to work towards the common goal of enabling IPv6 at a large scale with minimal disruption. By acting together, ISPs, web site operators, OS manufacturers, and equipment vendors are able to address problems—including global scalability issues—in a controlled fashion and resolve them cooperatively.

  • Deploy360 logo

    Internet Society Launches Deploy360 Programme

    December 2011
    Deploy360 logo

    Internet Society Launches Deploy360 Programme

    December 2011

    The Deploy360 Programme serves as a bridge between the IETF standards process and adoption of those standards by the global operations community for such technologies as IPv6, DNSSeC, and Routing Resiliency and Security.

    IPv6 deployment efforts, in particular, confront the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses and deepen the Internet Society’s commitment to deploy IPv6 in developing countries via hands-on training workshops, facilitation of experience-sharing among operators, and increased awareness of IPv6 deployment imperatives.

  • Global INET logo

    Global INET Geneva

    22-24 April 2012
    Global INET logo

    Global INET Geneva

    22-24 April 2012

    To celebrate its 20th anniversary, the Internet Society holds its first global INET conference since 2004. Global INET 2012 carries the theme “Meeting at the Crossroads: Imagining the Future Internet” and, as a prelude, features a collaborative leadership exchange centered on this same topic. The conference serves as the forum for the inaugural inductions into the newly created Internet Hall of Fame and closes with keynote remarks by IHOF inductee and founding president of ISOC Vint Cerf. 

  • Lynn St. Amour at INET 2012

    Global INET Geneva

    22-24 April 2012
    Lynn St. Amour at INET 2012

    Global INET Geneva

    22-24 April 2012

    To celebrate its 20th anniversary, the Internet Society holds its first global INET conference since 2004. Global INET 2012 carries the theme “Meeting at the Crossroads: Imagining the Future Internet” and, as a prelude, features a collaborative leadership exchange centered on this same topic. The conference serves as the forum for the inaugural inductions into the newly created Internet Hall of Fame and closes with keynote remarks by IHOF inductee and founding president of ISOC Vint Cerf.

  • World IPv6 Launch badge

    World IPv6 Launch

    6 June 2012
    World IPv6 Launch badge

    World IPv6 Launch

    6 June 2012

    The Internet Society organizes World IPv6 Launch to motivate organizations across the industry—including Internet service providers (ISPs), hardware makers, and web companies—to prepare for and permanently enable Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) on their products and services as Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) address space runs out.

    The largest industry commitment to and deployment of IPv6 in the history of the Internet, World IPv6 Launch acts as a focal point to bring existing deployment efforts and industry players together. By acting together on the World IPv6 Launch, ISPs, web companies, and equipment vendors are able to cooperatively address common challenges and work towards the goal of permanently deploying IPv6 on the global Internet

  • GIR 2014

    GIR 2014

    June 2014
    GIR 2014

    GIR 2014

    June 2014

    The Global Internet Report is the first in a series meant to celebrate the progress of the Internet, highlight trends, and illustrate the principles that will continue to sustain the growth of the Internet.

    Open and Sustainable Internet 

    This report focuses on the open and sustainable Internet – what we mean by that, what benefits it brings, and how to overcome threats that prevent those of us already online from enjoying the full benefits, and what keeps non-users from going online in the first place.

    Given the rapid pace of change, it is important to solidify and spread the benefits of the open Internet, rather than taking them for granted.

    Report Highlights

    • Internet trends and growth
    • Benefits of an open and sustainable Internet
    • Challenges to the open and sustainble Internet
    • Recommendations to improve the Internet experience and increase access

    Executive Summaries

    The following executive summaries are now available for download:

  • MANRS logo

    Network Operators Around the World Demonstrate Their Commitment to a Secure and Resilient Internet

    06 November 2014
    MANRS logo

    Network Operators Around the World Demonstrate Their Commitment to a Secure and Resilient Internet

    06 November 2014

    Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security (MANRS) recommendations provide a coordinated approach to improve global routing system

    Leading network operators around the world announced that they have implemented a package of recommended measures that help improve the security and resilience of the global Internet.

    Working together, network operators have developed a tightly defined set of concrete actions to improve the global Internet routing system. The recommendations, called Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security (MANRS), recognize the interdependent nature of the global routing system and integrate best current practices related to routing security and resilience. More network operators from across the globe are encouraged to sign onto the movement and participate by visiting the website at www.manrs.org and completing the signup form.

    Organized by the Internet Society, and building on the demonstrated success of coordinated industry activities such as World IPv6 Day and World IPv6 Launch, MANRS represents a significant step forward towards building a more resilient and secure Internet infrastructure. 

    "The security of the Internet as a network of networks often relies on specific collaborative action. This initiative increases the security of the Internet by improving resiliency and stability of the underlying routing infrastructure," commented Olaf Kolkman, the Internet Society’s Chief Internet Technology Officer. "Participating network operators committed to the MANRS initiative are taking actions that address problems with incorrect routing information and spoofed traffic, demonstrating their collective responsibility to a healthy and secure Internet ecosystem. We encourage and look forward to other network operators around the world publicly taking these steps."

    Participating network operators have taken one or several of the expected actions defined by the MANRS framework. These include preventing propagation of incorrect routing information, preventing traffic with spoofed IP addresses, and facilitating global operational communication and coordination between network operators. Committed network operators are:

    • CERNET
    • Claranet
    • Comcast
    • KPN
    • Level 3
    • NTT
    • RUNNet
    • SpaceNet
    • SURFnet
  • Internet Society Approach to Cyber Security Policy

    22 January 2015

    Internet Society Approach to Cyber Security Policy

    22 January 2015

    The headlines of today regarding hacking, exposure of large quantities of personal data, denial of service attacks, and the continued revelations about pervasive monitoring are deeply disturbing.

    The Internet Society believes that with each new cyber-related incident, we risk losing the trust of users who have come to depend on the Internet for many of life's activities. And we believe that we also risk losing the trust of those who have yet to access the benefits of the Internet, thereby discouraging the kind of investment needed to complete the job of connecting everyone in the world.

    Public policy can have a positive role to play in meeting the demands of public interest. However, while action is required, all policy initiatives must be both measured and balanced. There is a danger for legitimate policy responses to go too far in addressing security challenges, thereby jeopardizing the very infrastructure that both ties together the global economy and provides the engine for its growth. We are wary of a tendency for government to expand its powers in ways that:

    a) may not ultimately be effective; and 
    b) may further undermine individuals’ online privacy. 

    The technical community has long recognized that the future growth of the Internet hinges on the ability to secure core aspects of Internet infrastructure AND to protect the confidentiality and integrity of the data that flows over it. We continue to play a leading role in these areas.  

    We note that there have been significant strides made in just the past 18 months within the technical community to secure core aspects of the Internet (such as routing and the Domain Name System) and to empower end users to protect their own information with tools like encryption.

    Perspectives on cyber security

    Today’s cyber security trends are evolving at an overwhelming pace, posing an ever-present threat to our connected world. 

    At a global and individual level, while everyone talks about “cyber security,” it has been our experience that often we do not all mean the same thing. The reality is that because the Internet crosses all sectors of the economy and many aspects of people’s lives, we need to recognize the complexity of creating a secure Internet environment. 

    Security is not achieved by a single treaty or piece of legislation; it is not solved by a single technical fix, nor can it come about because one company or sector of the economy decides security is important. Creating security and trust in the Internet requires different players (within their different responsibilities and roles) to take action, closest to where the issues are occurring. Perspectives on cyber security are far from uniform, for instance:

    • Businesses need to safeguard customer information, protect commercial data, or prevent intrusions and damage to their corporate networks. 
    • Small companies and large companies face very different security issues. 
    • Users want to be secure and feel threatened about the effects of leakage of personal data.
    • Governments have to take into account the concerns of citizens and businesses while also dealing with any national security threats that an Internet attack might pose.
    • And, there are differences between developed and developing countries in how they address cyber security. While developed countries might be most focused on securing advanced computing infrastructure or funding cyber security R&D, a developing nation might well be more concerned with developing the technical and policy capacity to deal with online fraud.

    It is the legitimate claims of all of these stakeholder groups that explain why it is so difficult to reach consensus on how to define or address cyber security. Any framework for tackling cyber security needs to work from an understanding of the different ways in which the Internet is valuable to its different stakeholders.

    The path ahead

    From an Internet perspective and in the context of the growing threat vector from hacking, targeted cyber attacks on networks and individuals, and surveillance, the Internet Society’s approach to the development of cyber security policy initiatives is based on the following key considerations:

    1. The essential need to ensure international cooperation and cross-border collaboration.
    2. The adoption of policies that are based on open technical standards. The Internet would not have had the explosive success it has had if the software that has driven its growth weren't easily adaptable for other purposes on the network. Security solutions that are developed within expert communities—the Internet Engineering Task Force being an example—are more likely to be effective and scalable, and consistent with the Internet's basic principles.
    3. The need to develop policies that are flexible enough to evolve over time. We know that the technology is going to change. The solutions need to be responsive to new challenges.
    4. The fundamental importance of developing policies using a multi-stakeholder model. This means that effective policies cannot be unilaterally created by government and that all stakeholders must work together.

    We believe that within this policy framework, the core critical values of basic privacy protections and the freedom of speech cannot be overlooked.

    And finally, as a reflection of the Internet Society’s continued commitment to ensuring that the “Internet is for everyone,” this approach requires a willingness of those who are developing policy to truly listen to those who are affected by and who design and implement their decisions.

  • GCCS2015

    Statement From Members Of The Internet Technical Community After The Global Conference on CyberSpace 2015 (GCCS2015)

    17 April 2015
    GCCS2015

    Statement From Members Of The Internet Technical Community After The Global Conference on CyberSpace 2015 (GCCS2015)

    17 April 2015

    A statement from members of the Internet technical community – the African Top Level Domains Organization (AfTLD), Asia-Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC), .au Domain Administration Ltd (auDA), Council of European National Top-Level Domain Registries (CENTR), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), Internet Society (ISOC), Latin American and Caribbean TLD Association (LACTLD), the Ripe Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC), Dr. Michael R. Nelson, Dr. Alejandro Pisanty, George Sadowsky and Andrew Sullivan.

    We would like to congratulate the Dutch government on an innovative and successful conference. We also wish to thank the conference organizers for inviting governmental and non-governmental stakeholders to contribute to the development of the Chair's statement.

    We welcome the spirit of openness and transparency that has prevailed in the preparations of the Conference.

    The Internet technical community

    Organizations from the Internet technical community were actively engaged in the preparations for the Global Conference on Cyberspace 2015 and associated meetings, including the Global Commission on Internet Governance (GCIG) and the Dutch National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) ONE Conference.

    Participating organizations and individuals from the technical community come from all around the world. They work with governments, national and international organizations, civil society, academia and the private sector to pursue their objectives in a collaborative and inclusive manner. While each organization has its own mission and role to play, these Internet technical community organizations are motivated by a common vision of an open and accessible Internet that brings shared economic and social benefits to all the world’s citizens, now and in the future.

    The Chair's statement

    We welcome the Chair’s statement and believe it will serve as an important guiding statement as the global community works together to tackle cybersecurity issues. The statement notably recognizes that Internet security should be approached from the perspective that the Internet is “an engine for economic growth and social development” as well as the importance of trust. Furthermore, it promotes the notion that security is a collective responsibility and that we need to foster a culture of collaborative security. We are very pleased to see these concepts included in the statement.

    One of the examples of such collaborative security is the initiative proposed by the Dutch National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) to foster a smart coalition of interested parties to enhance and expand anti-spoofing efforts across the world - the root cause of large-scale Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. We look forward to active participation in this initiative, and the impact it will have on Internet security and trust.

    We are also pleased to see that the Chair's statement highlights the role of open voluntary consensus-based Internet standards in protecting and improving the security and resilience of the global Internet infrastructure. It also emphasizes that collective action from all relevant parties is needed to effectively implement these standards at the international level. Further, it underlines the importance of human rights, and that protection of human rights and security online are complementary concepts.

    Another initiative, launched at the conference, Internet.nl is an example of how adoption of such standards and best practices can be stimulated, by raising awareness and providing a platform where experience is being shared.

    Finally, we are pleased that through this statement, participants reaffirmed their "commitment to the multistakeholder model of Internet governance and called upon all stakeholders to further strengthen and encourage the sustainability of, participation in and evolution of this model”.

    We applaud the "commitment [of the participants] to the multistakeholder model of Internet governance [who] called upon all stakeholders to further strengthen and encourage the sustainability of, participation in and evolution of this model”. We support the view that “the multistakeholder approach has also been key in facilitating the implementation and realization of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) goals”. We join the call for “this year’s concluding stages of the ten-year Review of the WSIS to be as open and inclusive as possible, ensuring the meaningful participation of all stakeholders”. We would like further to express our support for the renewal of the Internet Governance Forum’s (IGF) mandate by the UN. We also support the inclusive and transparent process currently taking place globally leading towards the transition of the oversight of the IANA functions from the US to the global multistakeholder Internet Community. We recognize the value of the multistakeholder model as a key factor towards an enabling Internet environment.

    Global Forum on Cyber Expertise

    We are interested in learning more about the initiative of the Dutch government to create a Global Forum on Cyber Expertise (GFCE). We hope that the initiative develops to be inclusive towards all stakeholders. As further information becomes available, we look forward to sharing our expertise, especially that related to the development, implementation and deployment of open Internet standards, to the newly launched Global Forum on Cyber Expertise.

    Going forward

    As the Internet grows and continues to spur economic and social development around the world, the policies and practices of tomorrow must grow from the shared principles and the shared vision that underpin our collaboration throughout this week. It is now essential that all stakeholders, including governments take concretesteps to build together a stable, resilient and trustworthy cyberspace.

    To achieve this objective, all stakeholders must ensure that human capacities and fundamental rights are enhanced or enabled by the Internet, including:

    a) The ability to connect: The end-to-end architecture of the Internet is essential to its utility as a platform for connecting people, and thus for education, innovation, creativity and economic opportunity. In an information society, to support human development and protect human rights, all people need to have affordable access to an open and neutral network, and to the services that it provides.

    b) The ability to communicate: By enabling communication on an unprecedented scale, the Internet is a revolutionary medium for expression and collaboration. Genuinely free communication can only be guaranteed when privacy and anonymity are assured in principle, and where content controls are an exception rather than a rule.

    c) The ability to innovate: The remarkable growth of the Internet and its applications follow directly from the open model of Internet connectivity and standards development. Policies must encourage open technical standards and protocols that are developed through open, transparent and accessible processes.

    d) The ability to trust: Everyone’s ability to connect, speak, innovate, share, and choose depends on the Internet’s ability to support trustworthy internetworking—ensuring the security, reliability, and stability of increasingly critical and pervasive applications and services.

    Conclusion

    As leading actors of the Internet technical community, we wish to underline our strong commitment to maintain a safe and stable Internet environment that could further support the worldwide social and economic development in the ultimate interest of all stakeholders. 

  • IETF Logo

    Leading Companies and Organizations Commit over US$3M to Internet Engineering Task Force Endowment

    20 July 2016
    IETF Logo

    Leading Companies and Organizations Commit over US$3M to Internet Engineering Task Force Endowment

    20 July 2016

    Diverse funding source provides solid financial foundation for development of open Internet technologies and standards

    Leading Internet organizations and companies today announced a combined commitment of more than US$3 million for the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Endowment. The IETF is the Internet’s premiere technical standards body, gathering a large international community of network designers, operators, vendors and researchers concerned with the development and evolution of the Internet technologies and its architecture. The IETF Endowment will provide stable, long-term funding to support the IETF in its mission to make the Internet work better.

    “This endowment will help ensure that the IETF has the financial support it needs to expand the global community which produces the excellent technical standards that nearly 4 billion people rely on each day when they use the Internet,” said Gonzalo Camarillo, Chair of the Internet Society Board of Trustees. “The significant contributions by each of the organizations underscore the important role that the IETF plays.”

    Charter contributors to the IETF Endowment include:

    • AFRINIC (Internet Numbers Registry for Africa)
    • ARIN (American Registry for Internet Numbers)
    • Internet Society
    • RIPE NCC (Regional Internet Registry for Europe, the Middle East and parts of Central Asia).

    The IETF produces technical documents that influence the way people design, use, and manage the Internet. IETF standards are the foundation for the protocols for email, domain names, the Web, and the Internet itself. IETF participants are currently developing standards to provide the technical foundations for a global Internet of Things, improved security and privacy online, and enhanced real-time voice and video communications.

    Started in 1986, the IETF marks its 30th anniversary this year with more than 7000 documents published to date. With participation open to any interested individual, the work of the IETF is conducted largely online. Additionally, more than 1000 individuals gather at IETF meetings held three times per year around the world. For more information about the IETF, see: https://www.ietf.org

    About the IETF Endowment
    To protect open standards accessibility, the Internet Society has established the Endowment for the Sustainability of the Internet Engineering Task Force (or simply the IETF Endowment). The IETF Endowment will support the standards development initiatives of the Internet Engineering Task Force and provide long-term stability and increased diversity for funding IETF activities and operations. For more information, see: https://www.SustainIETF.org

    Quotes from IETF Endowment Contributors

    AFRINIC
    Alan Barrett, CEO of AFRINIC said, “Both AFRINIC and our members rely on the open standards created by the IETF, and have an interest in the sustainability of the IETF. In particular, we would not have any IP addresses to manage if it were not for the IETF. I am very pleased that we are able to contribute to the IETF Endowment.”

    ARIN (American Registry for Internet Numbers)
    John Curran, President & CEO of ARIN said, “By way of this contribution, ARIN recognizes the invaluable efforts of the IETF in the development and maintenance of the very protocols that make the Internet possible.”

    Internet Society
    Kathryn Brown, President & CEO of the Internet Society said, “Beyond the continued day-to-day support the Internet Society provides to the IETF, the IETF Endowment will provide a long term investment to support the ongoing development of the open technical standards. We invite others to join in giving to this important endeavor.”

    RIPE NCC 
    Axel Pawlik, Managing Director of the RIPE Network Coordination Center (NCC) said, “The IETF and the Regional Internet Registries share a long and productive history of working together to ensure the stability of the Internet's infrastructure. So the RIPE NCC is proud to be able to contribute to the sustainability of the IETF for the foreseeable future."

The Internet Society and Technology

The Internet Society has a long relationship with some of the core groups behind the development of Internet standards, such as the Internet Architecture Board (IAB), the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), and the IRTF (Internet Research Task Force).

Over the years, the Internet Society has worked to provide financial, staff, and legal support for these groups and their work in devising essential Internet standards with freely accessible specifications and open development. It has also advocated for an open standards process in policy forums, and worked to encourage and develop the next generation of network engineering leaders.

As part this history, the IETF is, today, an organized activity of the Internet Society. The Internet Society also funds the RFC (Request for Comments) Editor, which serves the Internet technical community in editing, publishing, and archiving the publication vehicle for technical specifications and policy documents.