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Technology

  • 2000

  • INET 2000 logo

    INET ’00 Yokohama

    18-21 July 2000
    INET 2000 logo

    INET ’00 Yokohama

    18-21 July 2000

    The 10th INET features a number of new tracks that reflect the millennial mood and the ascendancy of wireless technology, such as “Internet Science and Technology for the 21st Century” and “Mobile Internet and IP Network Applications”. The plenary panel discussion, “The Future of the Internet Layer”, revisits a topic (among others) that sparked debate at INET ’92, in Kobe—the exhaustion of the IPv4 address space.

  • Lynn St. Amour

    Lynn St. Amour Named President and CEO of Internet Society

    2001
    Lynn St. Amour

    Lynn St. Amour Named President and CEO of Internet Society

    2001

    Lynn St. Amour, who had previously served in the Internet Society’s Geneva office as global executive director and COO and as executive director for Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA), succeeds Don Heath as ISOC President and CEO.  Her leadership of the organization is distinguished by tremendous growth in the breadth and reach of the Internet Society’s programs in the realms of Internet policy and governance and in global development. It is also marked by the solidification of ISOC’s relationship with and support of the IETF and its standards work.

    Early in her tenure, St. Amour spearheads the Internet Society’s successful bid for the .ORG registry and establishes the Public Interest Registry (PIR) to oversee its operation. This will prove a turning point in ISOC’s fortunes, as it puts the organization on a much stronger financial footing, enabling more robust support of existing programs and partnerships and fostering the creation of new initiatives.

    The St. Amour era also sees a growing emphasis on the Internet Society's status as an international organization, through the opening of Regional Bureaus throughout the world and through ISOC’s increased presence within other international organizations.

  • Stockholm

    INET ’01 Stockholm

    5-8 June 2001
    Stockholm

    INET ’01 Stockholm

    5-8 June 2001

    The first INET of the new millennium, INET ’01 institutes changes in the conference format, with events divided into three “Summits”—Technology, Uses of the Internet, and Governance and Regulation—meant to reflect the components and forces that shape the Internet: “[T]hose who use it, those who steer it and those who build it.” Coming after the burst of the dot-com bubble but at a time when the Internet is becoming ever more entrenched in all facets of life, the conference features plenary sessions on intellectual property on the Internet and on the lessons learned thus far in Internet self-governance. For the first time at an INET, an entire conference “thread” is devoted to the IETF.

  • Washington, DC

    INET ’02 Washington, DC

    18-21 June 2002
    Washington, DC

    INET ’02 Washington, DC

    18-21 June 2002

    The first INET to be held in the US capital, INET ‘02 comes at a time when, as the notes for the Welcoming Remarks have it, “[t]he Internet is at a crossroads. In the next year or two, critical choices will be made about Internet standards and Internet policy that will shape the Internet for years for come.” One feature of the conference, the IPv6 Forum's IPv6 Technology Deployment Summit, points to one of the factors that will shape the Internet’s future. Also up for debate is the future of the INETs themselves, as one of the closing sessions asks “How can we change and improve the format and focus of the conference?” Also noteworthy in this first post-9/11 INET is a panel discussion on “Security and Anti-terrorism," which seeks to address the questions “How are terrorists, national liberation movements, and computer virus writers using the Internet? What can and should law enforcement agencies do in response?”

  • Barcelona

    INET ’04 Barcelona

    10-14 May 2004
    Barcelona

    INET ’04 Barcelona

    10-14 May 2004
    INET ’04 is held jointly with Spain’s Internet Global Conference (IGC) and features 180 speakers presenting more than 50 sessions in tracks covering a broad range of areas, including Corporate Strategy, New Technologies, Consumer Applications and Society, Politics and Culture. The 2004 conference adds an Internet Governance track, which is directed specifically at governments and policy makers and covers topics such as “The Changing Internet Standards Game," “Next Generation Policies for the Next Generation Internet," and a variety of sessions aimed at “Rethinking Internet Governance."
     
    INET 2004 will be the last of the Internet Society’s “original” INET conferences, and the last “global” INET until Global INET 2012 in Geneva.
     
  • African Network Information Center (AFRINIC) Incorporated

    October 2004

    African Network Information Center (AFRINIC) Incorporated

    October 2004

    The African Network Information Center (AFRINIC) is the Regional Internet Registry (RIR) for Africa, responsible for the distribution and management of Internet number resources such as IP addresses and ASN (Autonomou System Numbers) for the African region. After gaining provisional recognition by ICANN in October of 2004, AFRINIC becomes operational on 22 February 2005, and is granted final recognition by ICANN in April of that year.

    AFRINIC’s mission is to provide professional and efficient distribution of Internet number resources to the African Internet community, to support Internet technology usage and development across the continent, and to strengthen Internet self-governance in Africa by encouraging a participatory policy development. The Internet Society partners with AFRINIC in a number of endeavors, including seminars and workshops aimed at spreading awareness and implementation of IPv6.

  • RFC 4071

    RFC 4071 Defines the IETF Administrative Support Activity (IASA)

    April 2005
    RFC 4071

    RFC 4071 Defines the IETF Administrative Support Activity (IASA)

    April 2005

    In late 2003, the IAB set up an ad hoc advisory committee to look into and make recommendations concerning the future administrative needs of the IETF. That committee’s report was published as RFC 3716. The IETF asked the Internet Society for support in its efforts to establish an administrative restructuring process that would effect the improvements contained in that report, resulting in a commitment to establish an IASA within ISOC. RFC 4071 represents the final definition of the IASA, resulting in a streamlining of the IETF’s administrative functions, funding sources, and greater autonomy over its budget process.

    This development, and the establishment by the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI) and the Internet Society of a trust for the IETF, marks a turning point in the relationship between ISOC and the IETF, which formally becomes, along with the IAB and the RFC editor, and activity organized by the Internet Society.

  • INET 2005 Cairo

    8-10 May 2005

    INET 2005 Cairo

    8-10 May 2005

    In a departure from previous, “global” INETs, INET 2005 is a Middle East and Africa (MEA) regional conference, organized in conjunction with the Second Pan-Arab Regional Conference for the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in Cairo. In the session entitled 'The Internet: How it works, Why it works, Who makes it work?' representatives of the groups and organizations that enable and support the operation of the Internet infrastructure give first-hand information about just how the Internet coordination processes have evolved and how they work today. Speakers also include respected and experienced specialists from the MEA region.

  • ISOC IETF Fellows at IETF84

    Pilot of ISOC Fellowship to the IETF Programme

    June 2006
    ISOC IETF Fellows at IETF84

    Pilot of ISOC Fellowship to the IETF Programme

    June 2006

    The Internet Society pilots the Fellowship to the Internet Engineering Task Force programme at IETF 66 in Montreal. The success of this and a second pilot at IETF 67 lead the Internet Society to formalize the  Fellowship in 2007, as a means to identify and foster potential future leaders from emerging and developing economies and provide an opportunity for networking with individuals from around the world with similar technical interests. The program is also aimed at raising global awareness and understanding of—and participation in—the IETF and its work.

  • 2010

  • World IPv6 Day badge

    World IPv6 Day

    8 June 2011
    World IPv6 Day badge

    World IPv6 Day

    8 June 2011

    The Internet Society sponsors World IPv6 day as a global-scale test flight of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6). On World IPv6 Day, major web companies and other industry players come together to enable IPv6 on their main websites for 24 hours. The goal is to motivate organizations across the industry—Internet service providers, hardware makers, operating system vendors, and web companies—to prepare their services for IPv6, in order to ensure a successful transition as IPv4 address space runs out.

    World IPv6 Day acts as a focal point to bring existing efforts together. For the first time, players from all parts of the industry are able to work towards the common goal of enabling IPv6 at a large scale with minimal disruption. By acting together, ISPs, web site operators, OS manufacturers, and equipment vendors are able to address problems—including global scalability issues—in a controlled fashion and resolve them cooperatively.

  • Deploy360 logo

    Internet Society Launches Deploy360 Programme

    December 2011
    Deploy360 logo

    Internet Society Launches Deploy360 Programme

    December 2011

    The Deploy360 Programme serves as a bridge between the IETF standards process and adoption of those standards by the global operations community for such technologies as IPv6, DNSSeC, and Routing Resiliency and Security.

    IPv6 deployment efforts, in particular, confront the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses and deepen the Internet Society’s commitment to deploy IPv6 in developing countries via hands-on training workshops, facilitation of experience-sharing among operators, and increased awareness of IPv6 deployment imperatives.

  • Lynn St. Amour at INET 2012

    Global INET Geneva

    22-24 April 2012
    Lynn St. Amour at INET 2012

    Global INET Geneva

    22-24 April 2012

    To celebrate its 20th anniversary, the Internet Society holds its first global INET conference since 2004. Global INET 2012 carries the theme “Meeting at the Crossroads: Imagining the Future Internet” and, as a prelude, features a collaborative leadership exchange centered on this same topic. The conference serves as the forum for the inaugural inductions into the newly created Internet Hall of Fame and closes with keynote remarks by IHOF inductee and founding president of ISOC Vint Cerf.

  • Global INET logo

    Global INET Geneva

    22-24 April 2012
    Global INET logo

    Global INET Geneva

    22-24 April 2012

    To celebrate its 20th anniversary, the Internet Society holds its first global INET conference since 2004. Global INET 2012 carries the theme “Meeting at the Crossroads: Imagining the Future Internet” and, as a prelude, features a collaborative leadership exchange centered on this same topic. The conference serves as the forum for the inaugural inductions into the newly created Internet Hall of Fame and closes with keynote remarks by IHOF inductee and founding president of ISOC Vint Cerf. 

  • World IPv6 Launch badge

    World IPv6 Launch

    6 June 2012
    World IPv6 Launch badge

    World IPv6 Launch

    6 June 2012

    The Internet Society organizes World IPv6 Launch to motivate organizations across the industry—including Internet service providers (ISPs), hardware makers, and web companies—to prepare for and permanently enable Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) on their products and services as Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) address space runs out.

    The largest industry commitment to and deployment of IPv6 in the history of the Internet, World IPv6 Launch acts as a focal point to bring existing deployment efforts and industry players together. By acting together on the World IPv6 Launch, ISPs, web companies, and equipment vendors are able to cooperatively address common challenges and work towards the goal of permanently deploying IPv6 on the global Internet

The Internet Society and Technology

The Internet Society has a long relationship with some of the core groups behind the development of Internet standards, such as the Internet Architecture Board (IAB), the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), and the IRTF (Internet Research Task Force).

Over the years, the Internet Society has worked to provide financial, staff, and legal support for these groups and their work in devising essential Internet standards with freely accessible specifications and open development. It has also advocated for an open standards process in policy forums, and worked to encourage and develop the next generation of network engineering leaders.

As part this history, the IETF is, today, an organized activity of the Internet Society. The Internet Society also funds the RFC (Request for Comments) Editor, which serves the Internet technical community in editing, publishing, and archiving the publication vehicle for technical specifications and policy documents.